Washington, DC & Maryland

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TRIAL PRACTICE

HP Law’s Recent Results

The attorneys at The Law Offices of Joanne Roney Hepworth have extensive experience in representing clients accused of all types of criminal charges, including felonies, misdemeanors, conspiracy charges, drug charges, DUI, DWI, federal charges, fraud, gun charges, sex offenses, white collar crimes and other traffic offenses. 

 

Recent Results

 


a.    Disclaimer:  our website describes some of the legal matters that the attorneys of The Law Offices of Joanne Roney Hepworth have worked on in the past.  Our description of those cases is summary in nature.  You should be aware that the results obtained in each of the legal matters we have worked on were dependent on the particular facts of each case.  The results of other cases will differ based on different facts involved.  Nothing herein is intended to nor constitutes a guarantee, warranty or prediction regarding the outcome of your legal matter.  Every case is different and outcomes will vary depending on the unique facts and legal issues of your case. 

b.    Case #1 (KH 2012): 
i.    Defendant was charged with: (1) Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute 5 or more kilograms of cocaine and 280 grams or more of cocaine base in violation of 21 U.S.C. 841(a)(1), 841(b)(1)(A)(ii), 841(b)(1)(A)(iii) and 846 (potential penalty: term of imprisonment which may not be less than 10 years or more than life); (2) Possessing a firearm during a drug trafficking offense in violation of 18 U.S.C. 924(c)(1) and 2 (potential penalty: term of imprisonment of not less than 5 years in addition to sentence for underlying drug offense); and (3) Use of a communication facility to distribute drugs in violation of 21 U.S.C. 843(b) and 18 U.S.C. 2 (potential penalty: term of imprisonment of not more than 4 years).  The government’s evidence included wiretap calls, audio and video surveillence, documentary  and physical evidence.  After thoroughly reviewing the government’s extensive evidence, the attorneys at The Law Offices of Joanne Roney Hepworth became convinced of the defendants innocence and were successfully able to demonstrate to the prosecution that the defendant had absolutely no knowledge of the conspiracy and had no part in it in any way.  Attorney’s Joanne Hepworth and Michael Davis were able to get the defendant a rare “deferred prosecution” after which all charges against the defendant were dismissed with prejudice and resulting in no conviction and no jail time.

c.    Case #2 (B. C. 2013): 
i.    Defendant was charged, in a multi-codefendant federal case, with: (1) Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute 5 or more kilograms of cocaine and 280 grams or more of cocaine base in violation of 21 U.S.C. 841(a)(1), 841(b)(1)(A)(iii) and 846 (potential penalty: term of imprisonment which may not be less than 10 years or more than Life); and (2) Conspiracy to launder monetary instruments in violation of 18 U.S.C. 1956(a)(1)(A)(i) and (h) (potential penalty: fine of not more than $500,000 or twice the value of the property involved in the transaction, whichever is greater, or imprisonment for not more than twenty years, or both).  The government alleged that the defendant was a middle-man supplier in a conspiracy to transport eight kilograms of cocaine (which were later discovered to be fake) from Atlanta to Washington, D.C.  The federal agents believed the defendant had been duped into buying the fake drugs along with the co-defendants to whom the defendant was supplying the fake drugs.  The government’s evidence included wiretap calls, physical surveillance, GPS surveillance and text messages.  After conducting their own investigation and thoroughly scrutinizing the government’s evidence, Attorneys Joanne Hepworth and Michael Davis were able to successfully compile sufficient proof to demonstrate that the defendant had actually conspired to supply goat’s milk soap and knew the drugs were fake all along, and that it was the defendant who was duping his co-defendants into buying fake drugs.  Knowing there is no federal offense for conspiracy to sell “fake” drugs, Hepworth and Davis filed a Motion to Dismiss the charges.  The government dismissed the conspiracy charges against the defendant in exchange for his pleading guilty to Inducing Someone To Travel in Interstate Commerce by Fraudulent Pretenses in violation of 18 U.S.C. 2314 resulting in a sentence of only 7 months incarceration.

ii.    Below are few of our pleadings from this case:
•    Motion to Modify Conditions of Release (ECF 44)
•    Reply in Support of Motion to Modify Conditions of Release (ECF 48)
•    Motion to Sever Defendant  (ECF 75)
•    Motion to Dismiss Indictment (ECF 89)
•    Motion to Dismiss Count in Superseding Indictment (ECF 120)
•    Motion to Sever Defendant and Counts in Superseding Indictment (ECF 121)
•    Reply in Support of 121 Motion to Sever Defendant and Counts in Superseding Indictment, 120 Motion to Dismiss Count in Superseding Indictment. (ECF 139)

d.    Case #3 (J H DDC 2012): 
i.    Defendant was charged, in a multi-codefendant federal case,   with: (1) Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute 5 or more kilograms of cocaine and 50 grams or more of cocaine base in violation of 21 U.S.C. 841(a)(1), 841(b)(1)(A)(iii) and 846 (potential penalty: term of imprisonment which may not be less than 10 years or more than life); and (2) Unlawful possession with intent to distribute cocaine in violation of 21 U.S.C. 841(a)(1) and 841(b)(1)(C) (penalty: term of imprisonment which may not be less than 10 years or more than life).  The government’s evidence included wiretap calls, drugs and drug paraphernalia found in a car driven by defendant.  As a result of Attorneys Joanne Hepworth and Michael Davis’s motions practice and negotiating skills, we were able to reach a compromise with the prosecution and the defendant was sentenced to 24 months incarceration.

iii.    Here are few of our pleadings from this case:
•    Motion to Sever Counts and Defendants (ECF 89)
•    Motion to Suppress (ECF 90)
•    Motion to Dismiss Count (ECF 92)
•    Motion to Suppress Geolocation Evidence (ECF 94)
•    Memorandum in Opposition to 609 and 404(b) Evidence (ECF 99)
e.    Case #4 (B L DDC 2013):

i.    Defendant was charged, in a multi-codefendant federal case,  with: (1) Conspiracy to commit bribery and aiding and abetting in violation of 18 U.S.C. 371 and 2 (potential penalty: shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than five years, or both).  Defendant and others were accused of bribing public officials to impose a moratorium on the issuance of multi-vehicle taxicab company licenses while making an exemption for defendant and others’ vehicles.  Defendant and his co-conspirators were alleged to have paid over $250,000 in cash and also supplied trips, transportation and gifts to the public officials.  Defendant pled guilty, and as a result of extensive negotiations, Defendant was sentenced to only 12 months and one day incarceration.

iv.    Here is one of our pleadings from this case:
•    Sentencing Memorandum in support of the government's motion for downward departure (ECF 55)
f.    Case #5 (K B DDC 2014): 
i.    Defendant was charged, in a multi-codefendant federal case, with: (1) Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute 5 or more kilograms of cocaine and 280 grams or more of cocaine base in violation of 21 U.S.C. 841(a)(1), 841(b)(1)(A)(ii), 841(b)(1)(A)(iii) and 846 (potential penalty: term of imprisonment which may not be less than 10 years or more than life); and (2) Possessing a firearm during a drug trafficking offense in violation of 18 U.S.C. 924(c)(1) (potential penalty: term of imprisonment of not less than 5 years in addition to sentence for underlying drug offense).  The government’s evidence revealed that the defendant’s house had served as a meeting place for numerous large scale drug transactions and that the defendant had been involved at the top of an extensive ring  selling large quantities of cocaine and cocaine base around Washington, D.C.  The government’s evidence included wiretap calls, video surveillance, and statement of an informants.  As a result of Attorneys Joanne Hepworth and Michael Davis’s extensive discovery review, motions practice and discussions with the defendant and the government, the defendant entered into a plea agreement to conspiracy to distribute cocaine and cocaine base and conspiracy to money launder, and received a sentence of 60 months incarceration.

g.    Case #7 (D R DDC 2011):
i.    Defendant was charged with Armored Car Robbery and aiding and abetting in violation of 18 U.S.C. 2113(a), 2113(d) and 2 (potential penalty: shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than twenty-five years, or both).  Defendant and a friend, who worked as an armored car driver, agreed to rob the armored car that defendant’s friend would be driving.  Defendant, along with a third person, held-up the armored car, which was being transported by defendant’s friend and another security worker, with a fake pellet gun.  The defendant and his co-conspirators stole over $720,000.00.  Defendant pled guilty and received a sentence of 80 months incarceration.
v.    Here is one of our pleadings from this case:
•    Sentencing Memorandum (ECF 27)

h.    Case #8 (L V DDC 2007)
i.    Defendant was charged with: Unlawful possession with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine and aiding and abetting in violation of 21 U.S.C. §§ 841(a)(1) and 841(b)(1)(B)(ii) and 18 U.S.C. § 2 (potential penalty:  shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment which may not be less than 5 years and not more than 40 years).  As a result of The Law Offices of Joanne Roney Hepworth’s extensive discovery review, motions practice and discussions with the defendant and the government, the defendant entered into a cooperation plea agreement to conspiracy to distribute cocaine and received a sentence of time served plus a period of supervised release for the first arrest.

vi.    Here is one of our pleadings from this case:
•    Sentencing Memo #1

i.    Case #9 (L V DDC 2012):
i.    Defendant was charged, in a multi-codefendant federal case,  with: (1) Conspiracy to distribute with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine in violation of 21 U.S.C. 841(a)(1), (b)(1)(B)(ii) and 846 (potential penalty:  shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment which may not be less than 5 years and not more than 40 years); and (2) Violation of supervised release.  Defendant had previously been convicted of unlawful possession with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine and aiding and abetting in violation of 21 U.S.C. §§ 841(a)(1) and 841(b)(1)(B)(ii) and 18 U.S.C. § 2.  Pursuant to a cooperation plea agreement, defendant was released from custody.  Four years later the defendant was arrested again for possessing with intent to distribute two kilos of cocaine in violation of 21 U.S.C. 841(a)(1) and 841(b)(1)(B)(ii) and 846, and for violation of supervised release.  As a result of Attorneys Joanne Hepworth and Michael Davis’s extensive discovery review, discussions with the defendant and the government and sentencing pleadings, the defendant entered into a cooperation plea agreement to conspiracy to distribute cocaine and received a sentence of 22 months incarceration plus a period of supervised release for the second arrest.

vii.    Here is one of our pleadings from this case:
•    Defendant’s Sentencing Memo #2